Cruising is to travel what Bob Ross is to art. It presents the illusion of world class travel while offering the adventurer enough artistic freedom to create a uniquely personal experience. And all of this is presented in such a way where the traveler can go forth with confidence in knowing there is a "home base" nearby and someone to call should the adventures on land go awry.

That got me to thinking. Tourism is a big deal in Louisiana. Have we ever thought of making "Cajun Country" a cruise port destination? I think we've got a few places along the coast where we could park a ship or two. But where would all of those cruise ship passengers and their money go? And what possibly could they do?

I've been on enough cruise excursions to know there doesn't have to be a lot going on to call it an excursion. And if you've been on a ship for a few days any reason to get off it is a good one. So, we put our collective heads together and came up with a couple of suggestions that "could" be considered tourist destinations.

Now we've left off the usual suspects when it comes to tourism. You know a certain pepper sauce plant, a haunted mansion with ghosts in the trees, and a couple of different folklife recreation venues. Those destinations would most assuredly be the star attractions of any South Louisiana visit.

Our excursions, the one's that you're about to read more about, would be the one's that people remembered and told their friends about. Now just to be fair maybe, some of the tours are inside jokes that we in South Louisiana could laugh and smile about while we collect the ticket and tourism fees.

Some of these tour proposals are downright preposterous. But, quite frankly, with a little planning and investment, some of these tours could be real money makers with or without a cruise ship.