My first-hand knowledge of alligator hunting is all based on the television show Swamp People. I have been a fairly faithful fan of the show for several years now and when I see how the professionals struggle sometimes with the large reptiles, I am pretty sure an alligator hunt that involved me would wind up in what many would describe as an "unfortunate outcome". It would probably be the only time an alligator had ever taken the gun from the hunter and turned the tables.

But, we digress, let's talk about the ladies and gentlemen who know what they are doing when it comes to harvesting one of Louisiana's most iconic crops. Alligators are coveted not only for their leather but their meat too. And, if what I am understanding is correct, the thrill of the hunt is a big part of earning a chance to hunt gators on public lands.

Currently, applications to hunt 'gators on 19 wildlife management areas, 28 public lakes, and one Army Corps of Engineers property are being taken through the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries website. The applications are being taken online only and each person may submit only one.

wlf.louisiana.gov

Now, should you be chosen in the lottery you will be given tags to harvest and claim three alligators. LDWF says that last year 2,278 hunters applied for the 421 available opportunities. This year the number of opportunities is up by ten, to 431.

Application for the lottery can be made via the LDWF site. The application process will close on June 30th. The hunts can be taken anytime between August 25th and October 30th. You do need to be at least 16 years old, plus you'll need an alligator hunting license which will cost you $25 and your alligator tags will cost you $40 each.

I just hope you'll be careful because those 'gators can be sneaky quick. How quick? Well let's see how you'd fare against them and a few other of Louisiana's feathered and furry friends.

Can the Average Person Outrun These Louisiana Creatures?