Louisiana Congressman Clay Higgins made an impassioned speech on the House floor as he was questioning the Buffalo, NY police commissioner.

Congressman Higgins' speech was so impassioned that he tossed his ink pen in exasperation.

The speech took place during the questioning of Buffalo, New York's police commissioner Joseph Gramaglia as he was testifying in front of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform on Wednesday, May 8, 2022.

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The reaction to Congressman Higgins' video was, as one would guess, quite divided, with people on both sides of the gun control issue chiming in.

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Siding with Congressman Higgins on the issue, supporters of 2nd Amendment rights encouraged him to "stand firm" and "keep fighting the good fight."

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One Twitter user who thanked Congressman Higgins for his opposition to sensible gun laws gave a rather redundant definition of some of the wording in the Constitution to make a point:

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In the video, Congressman Higgins' argument against sensible gun laws included his take on what happened in the United States after World War II.

15 million American men came home from WWII, with deep scars, and significant skills... there was weapons everywhere... my father was one of those men... We had guns everywhere... there was virtually no regulation. - Congressman Clay Higgins via Twitter

Congressman Higgins goes on to say that "any child in the 50s could buy a weapon from any seller if daddy sent them with the money", and that our country didn't have mass shootings then.

Watch Congressman Higgins' speech below:

Twitter was quick to do some fact-checking on his speech:

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The website Behind the Tower takes a dive into the history of mass shootings in the United States, and the first one on record is a shooting that occurred in Mississippi in 1891. A man used a shotgun to fire upon students and faculty at a school house in Liberty, Mississippi, wounding at least 14 people, many of them children.

Twitter users also chimed in to remind Congressman Higgins that things were not coming up roses for everyone in "the good old days":

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One Twitter user pointed out that Congressman Higgins serves in Louisiana, and included some generic statistics about his home state.

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I would say, judging by the comments, that the statement "people are divided on this issue" is actually an understatement: people are VERY divided on this issue.

Another Twitter user from Louisiana chimed in:

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And there it is: they brought up Congressman Clay Higgins' past. (If you are interested in finding out what the above Tweet referenced, the Bayou Brief printed an outline of Congressman Higgins' past.)

One Twitter user went as far as posting court documents from Congressman Higgins' former wife's request for a temporary restraining order (which, it appears, she was granted).

The documents were posted on the SCRIBD website.

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Why would someone post Congressman Higgins' personal past in a discussion about sensible gun laws and red flag laws?

Because they believe that, if the laws pass, Congressman Higgins might be prevented from owning any guns at all.

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Regardless of where you stand on this matter, it is clear to see that Congressman Higgins is passionate about this issue and believes that the majority of his constituents oppose sensible gun laws.

He may be right, according to the 2019 Louisiana Survey, a project of the Reilly Center for Media & Public Affairs at Louisiana State University’s Manship School of Mass Communication.

The project's findings showed that over half of Louisianians opposed most gun laws, but that they supported keeping guns out of the hands of the mentally ill:

Fifty-seven percent of Louisiana residents oppose banning the sale of assault weapons, and 61 percent oppose banning high capacity ammunition magazines. Of the three firearm restrictions included in the 2019 Louisiana Survey, preventing people with mental illness from purchasing guns is the only one to receive majority support (69 percent). In fact, a majority of residents support at least one form of expanding gun rights. Fifty-nine percent of Louisiana residents want the state to allow the carry of concealed guns in more places. - via Reilly Center for Media & Public Affairs at LSU's Manship School of Mass Communication

What are your thoughts on Congressman Higgins' questioning of the Buffalo Police Commissioner Joseph Gramaglia? Do you think that he should have asked more questions of the Commissioner? Or do you feel that his time was well spent reminiscing about days gone by when "guns were everywhere" and there were no locks on the doors?

I believe that we would be hard-pressed to find anyone in America who hasn't taken a side in this debate.

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