If you look up the origins of Tabasco hot sauce, it will show that the company was founded some 154 years ago. However, if you believe a painting hanging in one Acadiana Catholic church, you may be surprised to find out that this world-famous brand could be quite a bit older.

What we are alluding to here is a mural of the Last Supper painted inside St. Joseph Catholic Church in Parks. Apparently, some people say that there is a bottle of Tabasco hot sauce on the table between two of Jesus' disciples.

How could this be? Have we merely not noticed for all these years that Jesus and his friends loved Tabasco so much that it was imperative it be part of their feast together?

Was it possibly some further poetic justice taken by Leonardo da Vinci, the painter of this renowned artwork? (Oh, by the way, it is believed that da Vinci painted the Last Supper between 1495 and 1498.)

Before we go further with the story, you be the judge. Here are some photos of the mural posted on the St. Joseph Catholic Church Facebook page.

St. Joseph Catholic Church and St. Louis Mission Chapel, Facebook
St. Joseph Catholic Church and St. Louis Mission Chapel, Facebook
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St. Joseph Catholic Church and St. Louis Mission Chapel, Facebook
St. Joseph Catholic Church and St. Louis Mission Chapel, Facebook
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St. Joseph Catholic Church and St. Louis Mission Chapel, Facebook
St. Joseph Catholic Church and St. Louis Mission Chapel, Facebook
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Well, would you looky there...it is a Tabasco bottle!

Of course, the artist who painted this mural was just having a little fun and interjecting a little south Louisiana "culture" onto the painting.

According to officials with the church, the artist is Christie Hebert Hollier and she painted the mural around 2005. But it's definitely a conversation piece.

It has been so much a talked about work of art that the church recently got a letter from Shane Bernard, Historian & Curator for the McIlhenny Company (who, of course, manufacture Tabasco products).

Bernard crafted the following letter to Father Nicholas DuPré at St. Joseph Catholic Church to try to get to the bottom of this "urban myth." (Click on the letter to enlarge.)

St. Joseph Catholic Church and St. Louis Mission Chapel, Facebook
St. Joseph Catholic Church and St. Louis Mission Chapel, Facebook
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In a response on Facebook, Father DuPré wrote this about the query:

It is no myth. This medallion painting is about 20 feet up in the air mounted to one of the most rearward arches nearest the cry room on the south side of the Church and right by the stained glass window depicting the Eucharist.

So the next time you're passing through St. Martin Parish and you happen to pass through the lovely Village of Parks, stop by the church in town and check out a one-of-a-kind piece of art from some great folks who clearly have a great sense of humor.

Acadiana Towns With Multiple Pronunciations

In south Louisiana, we sure have a way with words all our own. Add in the Cajun-French influence and you will hear all kinds of different pronunciations coming out of the mouths of folks from Acadiana. How towns are pronounced is no different as illustrated by this list here.